Dr Susan Williams Medical and Imaging Sciences / School of Health, Medical and Applied Sciences

Senior Lecturer - Nutrition

PhD Graduate Diploma Human Nutrition (Deakin University) Graduate Certificate Sports Nutrition (Deakin University) Bachelor of Health Science (Nursing) CQU

Contact Details

Email: s.p.williams@cqu.edu.au

Phone: (07) 4923 2213 - Ext: 52213

Office Location

About Me

I am a Registered Public Health Nutritionist (RPHNutr) with Nutrition Society of Australia and I have a strong belief in translational research and understanding how to bridge the gap between nutrition research and the practice of nutrition in our communities. My primary research interests include behavioural nutrition in relation to food choices, obesity and health; family/home environments and the child and parent behaviours which occur within them; nutrition environments and nutrition behaviours of children and adolescents; and health and food/nutrition literacy.  I am interested in developing appropriate tools for assessment/evaluation of home and school environments in relation to child and adolescent health and behaviours.  My areas of research include:

  • Health and food/nutrition literacy and health information communication.
  • Population health approaches to improve nutrition behaviours in children and adults.
  • Understanding nutrition behaviours and food choices.
  • Food labelling systems.
  • Measurement of home and school environments in relation to nutrition, physical activity and sedentary behaviours.
  • Settings-based health promotion – child care centres, schools.
  • Community changes for promoting healthy behaviours and outcomes for children & adults.
I am discipline lead for nutrition in the school of Medical and Applied Sciences at CQUniversity.  In this role I work with academic staff across CQUniversity to ensure the Bachelor of Medical Sciences (Nutrition specialization) program meets the credentialing requirements (for Nutritionists) of the Nutrition Society of Australia, and the learning frameworks and requirements of CQUniversity and the Australian Qualifications Framework.  Within CQUniversity, I collaborate with other academic and teaching staff to review program content and delivery, and ensure performance outcomes of both the organisation and our students. 

My academic teaching involves the development, delivery and coordination of undergraduate nutrition courses for the Bachelor of Medical Sciences (Nutrition Specialisation).  The development and writing of courses is an ongoing process and courses which I have authored and revised since 2012 include: Human Nutrition; Nutrition; Nutrition in Practice; Food, Nutrition & Health, and Public Health Nutrition.  I am also involved in the development and implementation of other courses which comprise the Bachelor of Medical Sciences program including:  Introduction to Medical Sciences; Research project; and Advanced Work Integrated Learning. Other teaching prior to commencement of my current full time position includes Nutrition, Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology, Study and Research Skills for Health and Human Performance; Measurement and Evaluation. 

I am currently lead parent facilitator and advocate for the PEACHQld program in Rockhampton, Queensland.  This role involves coordination of marketing, recruitment, implementation and delivery of an evidence-based parent-led obesity prevention program for families with overweight and obese children.   I serve on several committees including: the leadership committee for the CQLiveWell Every Child Deserves Every Chance initiative; Central Queensland Hospital and Health Services (CQHHS) Human Research Ethics committee; the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) e- & mHealth Special Interest Group organising committee; the QUT TRIM Kids Project Expert and Project Advisory Committees; and the CQUniversity Medical & Exercise Sciences Program committee, and School of Medical and Applied Science Honours committee.  Over the last 5 years I have presented numerous media interviews on radio, television and in print on topics in relation to nutrition and child and adolescent health issues. I have also provided guest lectures/presentations on sports nutrition and nutrition, for Sports Medicine Australia, local sporting clubs and community groups, mining companies, child care centres, and other community organisations.  

Theses

PhD thesis entitled: Creating Healthy Adolescents and secondary School Environments: use of formative research in school-based obesity prevention (the CHASE project).

Abstract:

Declines in physical activity levels, increases in sedentary activity levels and a decline in the quality of our dietary intake are recognised contributing factors to the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. A socio-ecological perspective of adolescent overweight and obesity suggests that the specific environments in which adolescents spend most of their time may be most promising for the development and implementation of effective health promotion programs. Whilst schools may provide such an environment, effective and sustainable change to their obesogenic elements is dependent on comprehensive understanding of these complex settings and the interactions which occur within them. Linking a socio-ecological perspective with a program planning framework permits careful and systematic planning, promotes holistic understanding of the complexities of adolescent behaviours within school environments, and underpins the development of successful and sustainable school-based health promotion actions which match the objective and subjective needs of school communities.

This multi-phased, multi-component formative research project used mixed methodologies to identify factors within school environments which affect adolescent physical activity and nutrition behaviours. The project included two quantitative studies of (i) adolescent physical activity and body mass index (BMI) and the associations between adolescent behaviours, parent BMI and parent behaviours, (ii) adolescent nutrition behaviours, and the associations between adolescent behaviours, parent BMI and parent behaviours; and two qualitative studies of (i) adolescent perceptions and insight for promoting adolescent physical activity and healthy nutrition behaviours; and (ii) parent and teacher perceptions and insight for promoting adolescent physical activity and healthy nutrition behaviours. A final facet of this project operationalised these studies within the PRECEDE framework of the PRECEDE-PROCEED model. This ecological model provided a planning framework to collaboratively and comprehensively assess secondary school environments and identify the predisposing, reinforcing and enabling factors which influence adolescent physical activity and nutrition behaviours.

From six secondary schools (Catholic (n=2), Government (n=2) and independent (n=2)) in the large rural city of Rockhampton (population approximately 69 000), Queensland, a stratified (by gender and school year) random sample of adolescents (N=1954) was calculated. A total of 442 adolescents returned forms (22.6% return rate) and 362 adolescents (18.4% response rate) and 349 parents consented to participate in the study. Data was collected in 2005, and logistic regression was used to analyse data from 295 matched student and parent questionnaires. Analyses explored associations between adolescents BMI, participation in moderate and vigorous physical activity (MVPA) (using the Adolescent Physical Activity Questionnaire (APARQ)), and healthy nutrition behaviours (using the Adolescent Food Habits Checklist (AFHC)), and a range of adolescent and parent characteristics.

The mean age of adolescent participants was 15.1 years and a majority were female (62%). The mean age of adults (parents) was 42.7 years with a similar majority of females (67%) participating. 23% of adolescents and 62% of adult parents were classified as overweight/obese, and 62% of adolescents and 57% of adult parents were classified as sufficiently active. Slightly more than half (55%) of all adolescents met current guidelines for sedentary behaviours, spending less than two hours per day in small screen recreation. More adolescent males (58%) than females (52%) reported healthy nutrition behaviours, and more mothers (60%) than fathers (40%) reported healthy nutrition behaviours. Statistically significant differences were found between sufficiently active adolescent males (74%) and females (56%).

In males and females, significant positive associations were found between adolescent BMI and parent BMI (OR 3.21, p=0.006), adolescent participation in MVPA and parent support for participation (OR 7.38, p<0.001) and healthy nutrition behaviours and time spent in sedentary education activities (OR 2.44, p=0.004). Significant negative associations were found between adolescent participation in MVPA and parent BMI (OR 0.40, p=0.002). In males, significant associations were found between BMI and healthy nutrition behaviours (OR 31.18, p=0.009), healthy nutrition behaviours and time spent in small screen recreation (OR 0.13, p=0.002) and between BMI and time spent in sedentary behaviours, with inverse associations found between BMI and time spent in sedentary education (OR 0.07, p=0.012) and time spent in small screen recreation (OR 12.58, p=0.018). In females, significant positive associations were found between participation in MVPA and healthy nutrition behaviours (OR 3.24, p= 0.03).

From the total recruited sample of adolescents (n=349), a total of 126 adolescents (66% females) from school years 9, 10, 11 and 12, participated in 18 focus groups (10 junior groups, 8 senior groups). Qualitative data collected from these focus groups was analysed using a content analysis method. The majority considered healthy eating and physical activity important health issues and overall perceived their school environments to be more supportive of physical activity and less supportive of healthy nutrition. Key factors identified include limited availability and variety of healthy foods, inexpensive unhealthy foods, school policy and practice regarding school sports uniforms and sporting achievements, limited range of activities and access to sports equipment/facilities, and lack of supervision.

A total of 146 teachers and 310 parents completed surveys about their school environments. Both quantitative and qualitative methodologies were used to analyse parent and teacher surveys. Similar to students, teachers and parents perceived schools to be very supportive of adolescent physical activity and less supportive of healthy nutrition. The majority of teachers believed school canteens required major improvements and many teachers believed their school was already doing enough to promote adolescent participation in physical activity. Results suggest that parents are ambivalent about their involvement in school-based activities related to adolescent physical activity and nutrition.

Schools were found to have a high level of community competence and readiness for action in preventing adolescent overweight and obesity and collaborative assessment of school environments identified many predisposing, reinforcing and enabling factors. Key areas for future school-based activity should include changes to the physical and social aspects with a major focus on school nutrition environments and focus on access and facilities for physical activity. Review and/or development of relevant policies are critical to guide practices and procedures within schools which aim to promote adolescent physical activity and healthy nutrition behaviours.

The development of effective and sustainable health promoting interventions is dependent on understanding the complementary and interactive relationships between individuals and their environments. This investigation of adolescent physical activity and nutrition behaviours provided an opportunity to determine prevalence and trends of behaviours, associated relationships and health outcomes in the local secondary school population. This collaborative exploration of school environments provided opportunity to identify the range of objective and subjective factors within local school communities which promote or hinder adolescents to develop healthy behaviours in relation to physical activity and nutrition. This research has contributed to knowledge of adolescent physical activity and nutrition behaviours, identified factors within school environments which influence adolescent physical activity and nutrition behaviours, and using an ecological perspective demonstrated the use of a comprehensive planning framework to assess school environments and identify key areas for focus in developing school-based interventions for the prevention of adolescent obesity.

Completed Supervisions

Mr. Timothy Johnson (Bachelor of Psychology Honours) (2014).  The Effects of Food Addiction on Obesity in Australian Young Adults.

Ms Rebecca Campbell (Honours-Psychology) Changes in Psychological Health and Body Image after Bariatric Surgery, Completed 2015.
Seminar Presentations

 Daniels L, Perry R, Vidgen H, Hartley J, Croyden D,  Littlewood, R, Williams SL. (2014).  Translating evidence to practice - PEACH a translational research case studyWorkshop – Dietitians Association of Australia national conference, Brisbane, May 2014.  

Grants

Saluja S, Williams SL, Ames K, Lawson C, Vandelanotte  C.  Diabetes Health Literacy:  Exploring the ability of Australian adults to appraise and apply health information.  Australian Health and Social Science Panel survey), CQUniversity, Fostering Collaborative Research Projects Grant Scheme (PRGS) 2014, $16 500.

Saluja S, Williams SL, Ames K.  Diabetes Health Literacy in Queensland Adults (Queensland Social Survey 2014), CQUniversity Population Research Grant Scheme, $16 500. 2014.

Williams SL. An investigation of home food environments and young children’s health (The Kids and Family Food Choices (KFFC) study), CQUniversity Seed Grant, $21 000, 2010.

Williams SL, Ronan K. Operationalisation of social capital – measurement of community participation. CQUniversity Population Research Grant Scheme, $15 000, 2011.

Burke K, Williams SL, Ronan K, Canoy D.  Examining factors that influence resilience in an Australian adult population.      Australian Health and Social Science panel study, IHSSR, CQUniversity, 2011.

Mummery WK, Williams SLAdvocacy & use of the Heart Foundation Tick. Queensland Social Survey, CQUniversity Population Research Grant Scheme, $15 000, 2010.

Refereed Articles

1. Vandelanotte C, Muller AM, Short CE, Hingle M, Nathan N, Williams SL, Lopez ML, Parekh S, Maher CA. Past, present and future of e- & mHealth research to improve physical activity and dietary behaviors. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (Dec 2015 – accepted).

(Impact factor: 1.77; Quartile Ranking: 1; Scopus Citations: 0)

2. Schoeppe S, Duncan MJ, Badland HM, Alley, S, Williams SL, Rebar AL, Vandelanotte C. Socio-demographic factors and neighbourhood social cohesion influence adults' willingness to grant children greater independent mobility: A cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 15:690.

(Impact factor: 2.26; Quartile Ranking: 2; Scopus Citations: 0)

3. Williams SL, Mummery WK (2015). We can do that! Collaborative assessment of school environments to promote healthy adolescent nutrition and physical activity behaviors. Health Education Research, 30 (2): 272-284.

(Impact factor: 1.61; Quartile Ranking: 1; Scopus Citations: 1)

4. Williams SL, Ronan K. (2013). Combinations of social participation and trust, and health status: an Australian perspective. Health Promotion International, 29 (4): 608-620.

(Impact factor: 1.38; Quartile Ranking: 3; Scopus Citations: 0)

5. Williams SL, Mummery WK. (2012) Characteristics of consumers using ‘better for you’ front of pack food labeling schemes – an example from the Australian Heart Foundation Tick. Public Health Nutrition, 16(12), 2265-2272. DOI: 10.1017/S1368980012005113.

(Impact factor: 2.25; Quartile Ranking: 2; Scopus Citations: 2)

6. Williams SL, Mummery WK. (2012). Associations between adolescent nutrition behaviours and adolescent and parent characteristics, Nutrition & Dietetics, 69; 95-101.

(Impact factor: 0.67; Quartile Ranking: 4; Scopus Citations: 6)

7. Scott D, Burke K, Williams SL, Happell B, Canoy D, Ronan K. (2012). Increased prevalence of chronic physical health disorders in Australian with diagnosed mental illness, Australia New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 36 (5); 483-486.

(Impact factor: 1.64; Quartile Ranking: 2; Scopus Citations: 14)

8. Williams SL, Mummery WK. (2011) Links between adolescent physical activity, BMI and adolescent and parent characteristics, Health Education and Behavior. 38 (5); 510-520.

(Impact factor: 1.6; Quartile Ranking: 2; Scopus Citations: 10)

Books & book chapters

1. Williams SL. Ronan K. (2015). Chapter 13: Community-oriented health services in low resource settings, in Elias Mpofu (ed). Community-Oriented Health Services: Practices Across Disciplines, Springer (2015, ISBN: 978-0-8261-9817-4.

2. Williams SL. (2014). Chapter 49: Nutrition. (Third Australian Edition, Volume 3) In Berman, Snyder, Levett-Jones, Dwyer, Hales, Harvey, Luxford, Moxham, Park, Parker, Reid-Searl and Stanley (eds). Kozier and Erb’s Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia.

3. Williams SL. (2012). Chapter 49: Nutrition. (Second Australian Edition, Volume 3) In Berman, Snyder, Levett-Jones, Dwyer, Hales, Harvey, Luxford, Moxham, Park, Parker, Reid-Searl and Stanley (eds). Kozier and Erb’s Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia.

4. Lockie S. Williams SL. (2010). Public health and moral panic: sociological perspectives on the ‘epidemic of obesity’. In Lawrence, G., Lyons, K. and Wallington, T. (eds) Food Security, Nutrition and Sustainability: New Challenges, Future Options, Earthscan, London.

5. Williams SL. (2010). Chapter 47: Nutrition. (First Australian Edition, Volume 3) In Berman, Snyder, Levett-Jones, Dwyer, Hales, Harvey, Luxford, Moxham, Park, Parker, Reid-Searl and Stanley (eds). Kozier and Erb’s Fundamentals of Nursing, Pearson Australia.

Conference Presentations

1. Williams SL, Saluja S, Ames K. (2015). Adults understanding of diabetes and their health information seeking behaviours. Oral presentation – Australian Diabetes Society conference, Adelaide, August 2015

2. Williams SL, Saluja S, Ames K. (2015). Adults understanding of type 2 diabetes. Poster presentation – Australian Diabetes Society conference, Adelaide, August 2015.

3. Daniels L, Perry R, Vidgen H, Hartley J, Croyden D, Littlewood, R, Williams SL. (2014). Translating evidence to practice - PEACH a translational research case study. Workshop – Dietitians Association of Australia national conference, Brisbane, May 2014.

4. Williams SL, Burke K, Ronan K (2011). The impact of childhood risk factors on adult physical activity. Oral presentation at the International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Melbourne, Australia, June 2011.

5. Williams SL, Mummery WK (2011). Factors influencing consumer use of the Heart Foundation Tick. Oral presentation at the Heart Foundation National Conference, Melbourne, Australia, March 2011.

6. Williams SL, Hanley C, Mummery WK (2010). Weight status and associations with food behaviours and factors influencing food purchases. Oral paper presentation at Australia and New Zealand Obesity Society (ANZOS) 11th Annual Scientific meeting, Sydney, Australia October, 2010

7. Williams SL, Mummery WK (2010) Adolescent sedentary behaviours – differences in behaviours and associations with obesity-related factors. Poster presentation at Australia and New Zealand Obesity Society (ANZOS) 11th Annual Scientific meeting, Sydney, Australia October, 2010

8. Williams SL, Mummery WK (2009). Formative research in secondary school-based obesity prevention. Oral paper presentation at Sports Medicine Australia, National Physical Activity Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

9. Williams SL, Mummery WK (2009). Associations between adolescent BMI, physical activity and nutrition behaviours and selected adolescent and parent behaviours. Oral presentation at Sports Medicine Australia, National Physical Activity Conference, Brisbane, Australia.

10. Williams SL, Mummery WK (2006). Process Evaluation of the Creating Healthy Adolescents and Secondary school Environments (CHASE) Project. Oral presentation at the International Conference of Obesity – Satellite Conference. Geelong, Victoria.

11. Williams SL, Mummery WK (2005). Engaging the local community in the development and initiation of the Creating Healthy Adolescent School Environments (CHASE) Project. Poster presentation at the National Physical Activity Conference. Melbourne, Victoria.

MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
Public Health and Health Services - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES
Public Health and Health Services - Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
Journal article

Khalesi, S., Bellissimo, N., Vandelanotte, C., Williams, S., Stanley, D., & Irwin, C. (2019). A review of probiotic supplementation in healthy adults: helpful or hype?. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 73(1), 24-37. doi:10.1038/s41430-018-0135-9

Link to ACQUIRE

Short, C. E., DeSmet, A., Woods, C., Williams, S. L., Maher, C., Middelweerd, A., . . . Crutzen, R. (2018). Measuring engagement in eHealth and mHealth behavior change interventions: Viewpoint of methodologies. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 20(11), 1-18. doi:10.2196/jmir.9397

Link to ACQUIRE

Müller, A. M., Maher, C. A., Vandelanotte, C., Hingle, M., Middelweerd, A., Lopez, M. L., . . . Wark, P. A. (2018). Physical activity, sedentary behavior, and diet-related ehealth and mhealth research: Bibliometric analysis. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 20(4), 1-18. doi:10.2196/jmir.8954

Link to ACQUIRE

Khalesi, S., Johnson, D. W., Campbell, K., Williams, S., Fenning, A., Saluja, S., & Irwin, C. (2018). Effect of probiotics and synbiotics consumption on serum concentrations of liver function test enzymes: a systematic review and meta-analysis. European Journal of Nutrition, 57(6), 2037-2053. doi:10.1007/s00394-017-1568-y

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S. L., Van Lippevelde, W., Magarey, A., Moores, C. J., Croyden, D., Esdaile, E., & Daniels, L. (2017). Parent engagement and attendance in PEACH™ QLD: An up-scaled parent-led childhood obesity program. BMC Public Health, 17, 1-10. doi:10.1186/s12889-017-4466-6

Link to ACQUIRE

Schoeppe, S., Alley, S., Van Lippevelde, W., Bray, N. A., Williams, S. L., Duncan, M. J., & Vandelanotte, C. (2016). Efficacy of interventions that use apps to improve diet, physical activity and sedentary behaviour: A systematic review.. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 13, 1-26. doi:10.1186/s12966-016-0454-y

Link to ACQUIRE

Vandelanotte, C., Müller, A. M., Short, C. E., Hingle, M., Nathan, N., Williams, S. L., . . . Maher, C. A. (2016). Past, present, and future of eHealth and mHealth research to improve physical activity and dietary behaviors. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 48(3), 219-228. doi:10.1016/j.jneb.2015.12.006

Link to ACQUIRE

Schoeppe, S., Duncan, M., Badland, H., Alley, S., Williams, S., Rebar, A., & Vandelanotte, C. (2015). Socio-demographic factors and neighbourhood social cohesion influence adults’ willingness to grant children greater independent mobility : a cross-sectional study. BMC public health., 15, 690-697. doi:10.1186/s12889-015-2053-2

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S., & Mummery, W. (2015). We can do that! : Collaborative assessment of school environments to promote healthy adolescent nutrition and physical activity behaviors. Health education research., 30(2), 272-284. doi:10.1093/her/cyv007

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S., & Ronan, K. (2014). Combinations of social participation and trust, and association with health status : an Australian perspective. Health promotion international., 29(4), 608-620. doi:10.1093/heapro/dat010

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S., & Mummery, W. (2013). Characteristics of consumers using ‘better for you’ front-of-pack food labelling schemes : an example from the Australian Heart Foundation Tick. Public health nutrition., 16(12), 2265-2272. doi:10.1017/S1368980012005113

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S., & Mummery, W. (2012). Associations between adolescent nutrition behaviours and adolescent and parent characteristics. Nutrition and dietetics., 69(2), 95-101. doi:10.1111/j.1747-0080.2012.01581.x

Link to ACQUIRE

Scott, D., Burke, K., Williams, S., Happell, B., Canoy, D., & Ronan, K. (2012). Increased prevalence of chronic physical health disorders in Australians with diagnosed mental illness. Australian and New Zealand journal of public health., 36(5), 483-486. doi:10.1111/azph.2012.36.issue-5

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S., & Mummery, W. (2011). Links between adolescent physical activity, body mass index, and adolescent and parent characteristics. Health education and behavior., 38(5), 510-520. doi:10.1177/1090198110385772

Link to ACQUIRE
Conference paper

Tom, M., Wibowo, S., & Williams, S. L. (2016). Optimized daily diet composition for a nutritionally balanced diet: An application of fuzzy multiple objective linear programming. In Proceedings IEEE International Conference on Fuzzy Systems (FUZZ-IEEE), 2016 (pp. 1628-1634). Piscataway, NJ.: IEEE. Retrieved from http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/mostRecentIssue.jsp?punumber=7694773

Link to ACQUIRE
Book chapter

Williams, S., & Ronan, K. (2015). Community-oriented health services in low resource settings. In E. Mpofu (Ed.), Community-oriented health services : practices across disciplines (pp. 183-206). New York, NY: Springer. Retrieved from http://www.springerpub.com/community-oriented-health-services.html

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S. (2012). Nutrition. In Unknown (Ed.), Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of nursing, volume 3 (2nd Australian ed., pp. 1379-1431). Frenchss Forest: Pearson Australia.

Link to ACQUIRE

Williams, S. (2010). Nutrition. In Unknown (Ed.), Kozier and Erb's Fundamentals of nursing, volume 3 (1st Australian ed., pp. 1292-1344). Frenchs Forest, NSW, Australia: Pearson Australia.

Link to ACQUIRE

Lockie, S., & Williams, S. (2010). Public health and moral panic : sociological perspectives on the 'epidemic of obesity'. In G. Lawrence, K. Lyons, & T. Wallington (Eds.), Food security, nutrition and sustainability (pp. 145-161). London, UK: Earthscan.

Link to ACQUIRE
Thesis / Dissertation

Williams, S. L. (2009). Creating healthy adolescents and secondary school environments: use of formative research in school based obesity prevention (the CHASE project). (PhD Thesis, Central Queensland University).

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Higher Education
HE Term 2 - 2019
NUTR12002 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2019
NUTR13001 - Public Health Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 2 - 2018
NUTR12002 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2018
NUTR13001 - Public Health Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 2 - 2017
NUTR12002 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
BMSC13012 - Advanced Work Integrated Learning
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2017
NUTR13001 - Public Health Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 2 - 2016
NUTR12002 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
BMSC13012 - Advanced Work Integrated Learning
Unit Coordinator
BMSC11006 - Food, Nutrition and Health
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2016
NUTR13001 - Public Health Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 2 - 2015
NUTR12002 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
BMSC13012 - Advanced Work Integrated Learning
Unit Coordinator
BMSC11006 - Food, Nutrition and Health
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2015
NUTR13001 - Public Health Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 2 - 2014
NUTR19001 - Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
BMSC19001 - Advanced Work Integrated Learning
Unit Coordinator
BMED19006 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2014
NUTR13001 - Public Health Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 3 - 2013
CHEM13032 - Research Project
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 2 - 2013
NUTR19001 - Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
CHEM13032 - Research Project
Unit Coordinator
BMSC12005 - Work Integrated Learning 2
Unit Coordinator
BMED19006 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2013
NUTR13001 - Public Health Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 2 - 2012
NUTR19001 - Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
BMED19006 - Nutrition in Practice
Unit Coordinator
HE Term 1 - 2012
NUTR12001 - Human Nutrition
Unit Coordinator
Vocational Education and Training